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off the fiscal cliff and congress doesn't take any action to soften the blow, tax rates will go up quite a lot on dividends, from 15% to more than 40% in most circumstances. there are economists who think that will have a big impact on stock markets and they could go down 10%, maybe 20%. i do not think those effects are as strong as some economists believe. i think it is something the market could get over. you're in a long term tax and vanished savings situation. i think you are basically going to be fine unless you're planning on retiring release soon. i do think that is something you have to keep in mind. diversification out of the assets that are most affected by these kinds of taxes is probably never a bad idea. host: john mckinnon is a reporter for "the wall street journal." he is now in the washington bureau. he was a columnist for "the miami herald." what sectors would be hit harder if deductions and loopholes or taken out of the tax code? guest: the stocks that pay a high dividend. these tend to be utility stocks. there are lots of old, established, u.s. industrial firms.
's the first part of the fiscal cliff. the second part of it is the spending decrease that this congress and the president agreed to the last summer to say we dramatically increase spending, we have to reduce that spending. that spending decrease that was agreed to had a deadline by the end of this year. if there didn't there would be across the board cuts. the house passed our spending decreases in may. the senate has yet to pass any. with that we're stuck with across-the-board cuts that will be in early january. and the tax rate for all americans. in 2001 and 2003 and then extended during the lame duck of 2010, every americans' tax rates were extended out to expire the 31st of december. every tax rate from the lowest to the highest is set to go up. some people see the problem is we're not taxing enough and so that solves the problem. to just go off the fiscal cliff and everyone will be taxed more. some say we don't take from some group and give to the other. some say go to the clinton tax rate. we had a booming economy and creating more jobs. if increasing taxes increases economic acti
into recession. i believe we can avoid the fiscal cliff and address our massive deficit but that requires doing three essential things: reforming our tax code, reforming entitlement programs, and better controlling our spending. we can get additional revenue by reforming our tax code. that means closing loopholes and limiting deductions. by closing loopholes and limiting deductions, we can make the tax code -- tax code simpler and fairer to stimulate growth in our economy. markets get the kind of certainty they need to invest, to grow and to hire. it's a growing economy, a growing economic base that creates more jobs and revenue, not higher taxes. the simple fact is, we must make america a great place to do business again. our pro-growth strategies in my home state of north dakota have broadened our economic base and raised revenue without raising taxes. that has resulted in the lowest unemployment rate in the nation. growing personal income and rather than a deficit, a budget surplus. in addition to pro-growth tax reform, we also need to start a fair and thoughtful process to reform entitlemen
and the president until the fiscal cliff is avoided. unlikely, but a reflection of voter frustration as both sides dig in. the white house demanding higher tax rates for the top two tax brackets, and the republicans refusing. after rejecting the obama administration proposal last week, house republicans offered an outline for $2.2 trillion in deficit reduction, mostly through spending cuts. and while president obama would not answer questions about the counterproposal -- >> no deal better than a bad deal, sir? >> reporter: -- a senior white house official assailed it as a step backward, saying if republicans do not agree to some higher rates for wealthier taxpayer, the nation will go over the cliff, and the american people will hold the republicans responsible. wall street remains optimistic a deal will be struck. so the lack of progress is not yet resulted in a market plunge. but some economists estimate that because of the uncertainty posed by the fiscal cliff, at least 200,000 fewer jobs have been created this year. the official deadline is december 31st at midnight when the ball drops in times
of the fiscal cliff discussions and sat down for lunch with former rival mitt romney. >> i am sure they will or have already compared experiences on the campaign trail. >> today president obama hits the road to push for his plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. but republicans have slammed him for campaign-style politics that they say just won't get the job done. rob and sunny, back to you. >> can you really imagine that they're not going to reach some sort of deal to avoid the fiscal cliff? i mean that would be so unpopular across the nation. >> you would -- if you can take an action that would solve the problem for 98% of the country and then come back to the debate about the wealthiest 2%, let's get that first chunk done. republicans fear they could lose leverage if they cave in on the middle-class issue. apparently the president, his team has made increased demand here including, a provision now, part of the negotiations where, the congressional control over the debt limit would go away. and congress does not like to have its power take any way. so maybe the white house, upped the an
and looking at the fiscal cliff and talking about raising taxes that will not put a dent in the spending, so what is the answer? >> gretchen: the suggestion i make let's go back to the programs we had five or six years ago. there was a safety net five or six years ago. if you lost your job in 2006, you got some help but not the type of help people have got since then. we go back to that situation and maybe we have a hope much having a labor market go back to the way it was five or six years ago. >> gretchen: professor which politician, republican or democrat is going to be doing what you just said? >> not the ones from my district. >> gretchen: i mean, they are in eight bind are they not? republicans and democrats are in a bind. will be the one to come to the podium and say let's stop those unemployment benefits. >> it is a bind and the europeans worked it out before . they found helping for the unemployed is politically popular and economically damaging and they did it for decade upon decade and continue to do it. and so yeah, i am not optmistic that we will go back to where we were five ye
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6